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Even though we're different, we're really quite the same.

The clitoris is a complex yet fascinating sexual organ, one that provides many comparisons to your penis! While containing a similar shaft, with many differences in regards to how it looks and where it's placed, but with comparable functionality. For instance, few men can orgasm without direct stimulation to their shaft. Sure, it's possible, but it isn't the norm. The corresponding body part for a woman is her clitoris – the whole thing, not just the clitoral head. Therefore, trying to get a woman to orgasm without 'stroking her shaft' so to speak is possible, but not probable.

The vaginal opening holds the most of a woman's nerve endings along the vaginal canal, other than that small disc-shaped space an inch or so up the shaft called the G-Spot. The vagina does feel pressure, but most of its sensitivity lies where the vaginal canal connects to the clitoral network: the G-Spot, the A-Spot further back which controls lubrication, and the exterior contact points in the vaginal opening and the clitoral head/hood.

The skin of a man's scrotum compares to a woman's labia majora and minora. The seam that lies along the length of the scrotum is where a woman's labia lips part to offer her moist opening. The nerve endings are similar for both sexes in their corresponding areas. Stimulating a man's scrotum, while pleasurable, will rarely make him come if nothing else is happening. If you want to pleasure your woman, you need to get to all her sensitive spots, the way she does for you when her lips caress your shaft from tip to hilt.

Normally, men orgasm when they are aroused from direct penile stimulation. The comparable act for women then is when their clitoral head, or somewhere else along the clitoral network, receives direct stimulation. So let's talk a bit more about this clitoral network, and the clitoral head.

And Bit of Biology

Let's go back to our anatomical description of a woman's genitalia for just a little while to explain the concepts a bit more extensively. The clitoral head – the bud that you see poking out when a woman is aroused – is actually just the tip of a large, interconnected network of nerve endings. Covering the tip is the clitoral hood, which retracts during arousal and intercourse to allow for further stimulation.

As the clitoral head moves from the outside of a woman’s body to the inner workings of her genitalia, it expands into a complex network of nerves and tissues. Starting just under the fatty layer that surrounds this entire area, the network starts off with the clitoral shaft – similar to a man's penile shaft – and then separates into two shafts and does a U-turn. The turn, called the clitoral knee, wraps back around to extend to the G-Spot at one angle, and the labia minora and majora at another. Basically the entire network hub meets up at the clitoral hood, almost like a flower in wait to bloom. When in its normal, un-aroused state, the clitoral head seems much like a budding flower waiting to bloom, and when a woman gets aroused, it opens up its petals internally, expanding in both directions down and out.

As the clitoral hood reacts and expands very much like the head of a penis, it is able to increases in size and becomes erect. When it fills with blood, the internal U-turn straightens out somewhat, and lies suspended even closer to the woman's skin because of its engorgement.

      

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